Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Potential output of Georgia(country) Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Potential output of Georgia(country) - Essay Example Georgia are agriculture (12.5%), industry (27.9%) and services (59.6%).3 According to Georgia Economic Review (2009) the nominal Gross Domestic Product of Georgia has increased from 8,564 in 2003 to 19,070 in 2008. It means that in the last five years, the total increase in nominal GDP of the country is about 123%. The real GDP growth rate 2008 of Georgia is 2.1% which means that the output level of the country has increased. The global financial crisis 2007-2009 has lowered the GDP of many countries while the output of Georgia even during the crisis has remained positive. The value of nominal GDP shows that major increase in nominal GDP is brought by inflationary pressures and increase in the worth of goods and services; however, real GDP explicitly shows that a small increase in output of the country has been also seen. Georgia is considered as a country rich in energy resources. However, in 2007, the total oil extraction was 55-60 thousand tons which was very low as compared to the annual demand of 750 thousand tons.4 On the other hand in the same year, the annual consumption of electricity in the country was about 8.5 billion kWh while the country production was higher than consumption, thereby making Georgia a net electricity exporter.5 â€Å"It is the only country in the region (which doesn’t have its own gas resource) that was not affected by gas crises in January 2009 (Georgia Economic Overview).† Georgia has huge opportunities in hydro energy because of the construction of 500 kv power transmission line to Turkey, 78 MV Paravani HPP and 38 MW Mtkwari HPP. Surprisingly, although its hydro energy output is so huge however, only 18% of hydro potential has been used. The overall industrial production growth rate of Georgia in 2008 is -1%. The potential output of agriculture sector of the country has started to cover the wreckage caused by civil unrest. In the Georgian agriculture, winemaking is the major area however, since Russia was the major importer of

Friday, January 31, 2020

English 101 Coursework Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

English 101 - Coursework Example ther side, the critics strongly raise their voice to mark the nuclear power as extremely dangerous and a declining energy source because of decreasing proportion of its production. They point to the problem of storing radioactive waste that has a high risk for severe radioactive contamination and the possibility of nuclear proliferation. So it is certainly a critical debate. We can see these rhetorical effects of the positive and negative attitude towards nuclear power. Although nuclear power plants have a past record of safety and efficiency with discharging no green house gases in the atmosphere, the question is why the number of plants in U.S.A has been declined in the past few years and the percentage of electricity from nuclear power is not as high as that of other countries like Japan, France. It is said that the industry has been declined because of fierce emotional resistance to this unreliable technology that has a great potential of accidental deadly radiation. Is it merely an emotional matter to protest against this serious matter? The fact is why it would be unreliable technology when it has efficiency, sustainability and safety of operation. So it can be said that it is the misuse of this technology which can be turned in to the global threat. The most funny thing is that still there is no initiative to invent the new technology to dispose the plants’ radioactive waste. So although it is not producing green house gases but its unmannered waste is seriously dangerous for public health and safety.At last it is also mentioned that the vice president Dick Cheney emphasized on building new nuclear power plants, but it is not a fun to build new nuclear power plants in a short

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Rwanda: Genocide and Refugee Crisis Essay -- History Genocide Murder H

"How can I ever forget the scene where my husband was massacred right in my presence. It was a nightmare. It was a nightmare. I live through it every day and it is engraved forever in my memory.† During one April, not so long ago, the world sat back and watched as a turbulent political situation in central Africa turned into something the world will never be able to forget. 800,000 people murdered in just 100 days, 800,000 people needlessly slaughtered at the hands of extremists, 800,000 men, women, and children gone because of a more serious problem rooted in social prejudice and inequality, 800,000 killed in a genocide that the world could do nothing about until it was too late. Almost 50 years after the world pledged to never let anything like the holocaust occur again, the world had to watch as a genocide unfolded in Rwanda. Between April of 1994 and July of 1994 some 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutus were systematically killed as Rwanda fell into political despair and turmoil, leaving millions more as refugees struggling to put their lives back together in the aftermath of such horrific violence. The large number of people forced to flee the violence in 1994 not onl y created a massive refugee population in the surrounding countries of Zaire, Burundi, Tanzania, and Uganda, but the number of refugees within what is known as the Great Lakes region continue to cause political turmoil even today, almost eleven years after the genocide. This paper will focus specifically on the Rwandan refugees and their plight during the last ten years as a result of the genocide. In order to understand the reasons why the genocide occurred and created this refugee population the first section will give a brief overview to the poli... ...r Crossings: Return of Refugees, Identity, and Reconstruction in Rwanda." African Studies Review (1998): 17-28. <http://www.jstor.org>. Klinghoffer, Arthur J. The International Dimension of Genocide in Rwanda. New York: New York UP, 1998. Pottier, Johan. "Relief and Repatriation: Views by Rwandan Refugees; Lessons for Humanitarian Aid Workers." African Affairs (1996): 403-429. <http://www.jstor.org>. Smith, Charles D. "The Geopolitics of Rwandan Resettlement: Uganda and Tanzania." Issue: A Journal of Opinion (1995): 54-57. <http://www.jstor.org>. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), The State of the World's Refugees: Fifty Years of Humanitarian Action. New York: Oxford UP, 2000. Waters, Tony. "Tutsi Social Identity in Contemporary Africa." The Journal of Modern African Studies (1995): 343-347. <http://www.jstor.org>. Rwanda: Genocide and Refugee Crisis Essay -- History Genocide Murder H "How can I ever forget the scene where my husband was massacred right in my presence. It was a nightmare. It was a nightmare. I live through it every day and it is engraved forever in my memory.† During one April, not so long ago, the world sat back and watched as a turbulent political situation in central Africa turned into something the world will never be able to forget. 800,000 people murdered in just 100 days, 800,000 people needlessly slaughtered at the hands of extremists, 800,000 men, women, and children gone because of a more serious problem rooted in social prejudice and inequality, 800,000 killed in a genocide that the world could do nothing about until it was too late. Almost 50 years after the world pledged to never let anything like the holocaust occur again, the world had to watch as a genocide unfolded in Rwanda. Between April of 1994 and July of 1994 some 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutus were systematically killed as Rwanda fell into political despair and turmoil, leaving millions more as refugees struggling to put their lives back together in the aftermath of such horrific violence. The large number of people forced to flee the violence in 1994 not onl y created a massive refugee population in the surrounding countries of Zaire, Burundi, Tanzania, and Uganda, but the number of refugees within what is known as the Great Lakes region continue to cause political turmoil even today, almost eleven years after the genocide. This paper will focus specifically on the Rwandan refugees and their plight during the last ten years as a result of the genocide. In order to understand the reasons why the genocide occurred and created this refugee population the first section will give a brief overview to the poli... ...r Crossings: Return of Refugees, Identity, and Reconstruction in Rwanda." African Studies Review (1998): 17-28. <http://www.jstor.org>. Klinghoffer, Arthur J. The International Dimension of Genocide in Rwanda. New York: New York UP, 1998. Pottier, Johan. "Relief and Repatriation: Views by Rwandan Refugees; Lessons for Humanitarian Aid Workers." African Affairs (1996): 403-429. <http://www.jstor.org>. Smith, Charles D. "The Geopolitics of Rwandan Resettlement: Uganda and Tanzania." Issue: A Journal of Opinion (1995): 54-57. <http://www.jstor.org>. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), The State of the World's Refugees: Fifty Years of Humanitarian Action. New York: Oxford UP, 2000. Waters, Tony. "Tutsi Social Identity in Contemporary Africa." The Journal of Modern African Studies (1995): 343-347. <http://www.jstor.org>.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Old Spice: Revitalizing Glacial Falls

Old Spice: Revitalizing Glacial Falls Context: In 2007, P&G reported a growth of 5% in volume and a 3% increase in revenue for its Old Spice brand. The achievement was deemed â€Å"flat† when P&G had maintained a competitive media spending of 23% in the men's deodorant category. As a result, Mauricio O'Connell, assistant brand manager was tasked to address the reasons for the foundering sales of Glacial Falls scent, which was the worst performing scent not only in Old Spice's portfolio but also in the entire category. Diagnosis: Red Zone line is the higher-end product offering of the Old Spice brand featuring the Glacial Falls scent.From Exhibit 6, we see that consumers of this product enjoy the benefit of the enduring power of the scent keeping away the odors, thus having the need to use the deodorant once per day. Additionally, Old Spice products are easy use as well as offer a scent that is deemed clean and fresh by its loyal customers. However, Old Spice does not clearly d istinguish how their product can be a catalyst to energize, empower or give confidence to its users. The case also highlights that Old Spice had not advertised the Glacial Falls scent specifically.Additionally, P's media campaigns seem to have painted the brand as â€Å"old† and the customers of both segments associate the brand with the elderly. P&G's problem is its unfocussed position of the Old Spice brand and of the Glacial Falls scent that result in the â€Å"flat† growth in the men's deodorant category. Consumers cannot distinguish between the three product lines especially the difference between the â€Å"Classic† and the â€Å"Red Zone† line. The flat growth or the foundering sales of the Glacial Falls scent are neither a result of the low quality nor the poor smell of Glacial Falls scent itself.Proposed Solution: To improve the sales of the Glacial Falls scent, P&G needs to distinguish clearly between its product lines – Base, Classic and Red Zone. Based on the qualitative data presented in Exhibit 6, P&G should target Glacial Falls (a Red Zone product line offering) scent towards males in the younger males in the 12-24 years age group. Glacial Falls offers an important ability to block the odor for extended periods of time, a quality highly admired by the younger age group because odor elimination is equivalently perceived to boost male confidence.Further, to win over the younger customers, Glacial Falls should capitalize on the confident, smarter image of mature men capable of taking care of themselves as well as their women, an image that is portrayed the parent Old Spice brand. Implementation: To improve sales of Glacial Falls scent through the proposed solution above, P&G should offer Glacial Falls as a high-end product at a reasonable price (lower end of the Red Zone product line) because the younger generation (primarily the college students with low student-level income) should be able to afford it.The media campaigns should link the odor-eliminating feature of this product as a confidence boosting element for the younger generation thus energizing them every morning and keeping their spirits up throughout the day. Next, P&G needs to improve the product packaging and highlight an outdoors and an adventurous campaign easily connecting this generation with the benefits offered by the Glacial Falls scent.Finally, P&G should highlight the Red Zone line of product more that the Old Spice branding to market the scent effectively to the males in the 12-24 age group who detest an association with the elderly fragrance. Positioning Statement: To the younger generation males looking to energize their daily lives with confidence, Glacial Falls is the brand of fresh and clean fragrance deodorant that has the ultimate ability to block the body odors effectively throughout the day because it has a scientifically-proven, advanced odor blocking formula.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Climate Change And The California Drought - 1410 Words

Abstract The California Drought is one of the most catastrophic weather and climate related events in recent history. It has singlehandedly altered the geographic landscape of the state and brought down entire industries to a grinding halt. Not since global warming became a prominent fixture in the national spotlight has a climate issue so deeply challenged Californians to reconsider their lifestyles according to their climate conditions. This essay will examine the origins of climate change and the California Drought, how the two are related, the current state of California as a result of the drought, and the future outlook of California. Climate change is the most significant, most revisited, most controversial, most discussed climate issue in modern history. Global warming serves as a glaring demerit on the lengthy list of accomplishments of mankind: a reminder that progress coupled with reckless abandon never has a good outcome. Though its presence in the national spotlight is a recent phenomenon, the early stages of global warming were detected centuries ago. In 1896, Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927), claimed that the use of fossil fuels may have an effect on the global climate. Arrhenius hypothesized that there was a distinct relation between carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and global temperatures. He based this hypothesis on the discovery that the average surface temperature of the earth had a direct correlation with theShow MoreRelatedIntroduction. This Is One Of The Many Problems California1574 Words   |  7 PagesThis is one of the many problems California has been facing even today. Drought has been a growing problem in California each year. How to tackle this problem is up to government and many scientists. There have been many case studies determining how and why drought has devastated the state of California. Water is a necessary and most important resource in California. Our water comes from groundwater, rivers, or lakes. Since California is facing a tremendous drought these resources are becoming destroyedRead MoreCalifornia Drought And Its Effects On The Air Quality1260 Words   |  6 PagesDecember 2015 California Drought The California drought has been extremely harmful to the states’ air quality. Since 2012, California has seen the worst drought conditions in 1,200 years and it is severely affecting air quality (California’s drought, 2015). As of 2015, the cities of Hanford, Merced, Modesto, Fresno, Yuba City, Lancaster-Palmdale, Chico, Sacramento, and Bakersfield have been experiencing exceptional drought coverage (Pestano, 2015). California has a Mediterranean climate, which is aRead MoreDrought And Its Effects On Drought1555 Words   |  7 Pagesenvironmental problems around the world. These problems such as drought, global warming, and pollution are caused by our actions, mistakes, or just by nature. Out of the various environmental problems, drought is one of the hazard of nature that is happening throughout some parts of the world, especially in California, United States. In general, drought is a â€Å"period of dry weather† or â€Å"an extended shortage of water† (Jaworski). There are two types of drought definitions: conceptual and operational definitionsRead MoreThe Effect Of Temperature Increases Due On Anthropogenic Warming Change The Probability Of Precipitation Deficits That Cause Severe Drought Conditions? Essay1724 Words   |  7 Pagestemperature increases due to anthropogenic warming change the probability of precipitation deficits that cause severe drought conditions, and determine what the conditions will look like in the future. They used historical precipitation and temperature data with Palmer Drought Metrics and global climate models to attempt to answer this question. It was found that in the past twenty years, the frequency of drought years has doubled, without any significant change in the trends of precipitation variabilityRead MoreImpact Of The Agricultural Industry On The United States Essay1676 Words   |  7 Pages2013 and 2014 drought in California was an exceptional climate event in the western coast of the Unit ed States( Swain) The drought that has impacted the state of California has been a national phenomena for a few years now and how it affects the climate and economic aspects of the United States economy has helped increase awareness to the general public of the United States. California has a majority of all farming in the U.S., including crops that are exclusive to California , These crops thatRead MoreThe Causes And Concepts Of Drought1715 Words   |  7 Pagesfood to feed people, or with the drought that has dried up all the water, should they pack up and call it quits. Drought is a serious issue that has affected California in recent years and caused many issues. This paper will focus on the causes and concepts of drought, the major consequences, and how people can prepare for the next drought in California. There are many weather tragedies that effect people, but none have had the effect on California like the drought. ii. Meteorological Causes / ConceptsRead MoreCause And Effect Of Drought1499 Words   |  6 PagesIf you live in California you most likely have been affected or seen the impact of a drought. People living in different regions experience varying amounts of precipitation. These regions are also supplied with water from various sources such as streams, lakes and rivers that come from the snowpack in the mountains. This anticipated and relatively reliable source of water is used and managed for many actions, as water is vital to life. A drought occurs when less rainfall or water flow than isRead MoreCalifornia s Drought : A Destructive Weapon Of Mass Destruction1348 Words   |  6 PagesCalifornia’s Drought I. Introduction U.S. Secretary John Kerry calls, † climate change can now be consider another weapon of mass destruction, perhaps the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction† (Arshad Mohammed,2014). In fact, many scientists say that today in California’s drought get worse on the record, for example in 2015, more than 97 percent of California was involved in an average drought or worse. (Stephan Feller, 2016).I try to find some reaches about California’sRead MoreThe Importance Of Weather Patterns And Extremes1241 Words   |  5 Pageshazards being droughts and heat waves. Chang et al. (2015) evaluated the change in precipitation due to extratropical cyclone activity and found that most of the precipitation that the region receives during the winter is due to extratropical cyclones and their fronts. When evaluating three consecutive winters, results showed that precipitation was below average. This lack of precipitation, paired with higher th an average temperatures, caused extreme dryness, and as a result, much of California, includingRead MoreCauses And Consequences Of The Drought1261 Words   |  6 PagesIf you live in California, you must have seen the roadside electronic boards displaying the message: Serious Drought. Help Save Water. Now, it is the third year of this serious drought. According to the USGS (2014), 2013 is the driest year in records from when California became a state of the U.S., and the drought does not seem to be going to an end soon. Imagine that, you have to take a shower for only two minutes at a certain time due to the restriction, instead of at any time you want; you have

Monday, December 30, 2019

The Spectrum Of Human Nature Essay - 1639 Words

Blair Hu Dr. Madon Literary Explorations III 25 October 2016 The Spectrum of Human Nature Iago, the main villain of William Shakespeare’s Othello, is a manipulative mastermind, able to weave an intricate web of lies that eventually leads to the death of the namesake of the play, Othello. Iago provides a multitude of rationales which explain his motivations for his deeds through sprawling soliloquies, such as the suspicion that Othello might be sleeping with his wife, Emilia, or that Othello denies him a promotion, instead giving it to the inexperienced Michael Cassio. Although, initially, these motivations explicitly stated by Iago sound credible, they ultimately crumble as the audience learns more about both the plot and the characters. Furthermore, by providing such a diverse range of feeble justifications, the audience of Othello is able to conclude that a deeper, unstated force fuels Iago’s hatred for Othello. Readers today have attempted to interpret this unstated force with a modern twist: that Iago’s hatred stems from his homosexual lust for Ot hello. However, these interpretations are loosely supported by textual evidence, which are then often quoted out of context . By establishing that both the reasons Iago himself provides and modern explanations to explains his decisions are lackluster, this leaves the audience with one supportable rationale remaining: that Iago has no motive for his actions. Additionally, by assigning a human character with such an unexplainableShow MoreRelatedThe View Of The Utopian Vision902 Words   |  4 Pagesof the entire political spectrum. The Tragic Vision, on the other hand, has the ability to coexist with the entire political spectrum. This is due to the fact that Tragic Vision has flexibility and it allows for learning well as growth in human nature. Despite the fact that humans for the most part are selfish we have an ability to learn from our mistakes and grow from them and in this way the Tragic View encompasses the ideologies of both sides of the political spectrum. People from a left-wingRead MoreNature And Nature Of Nature947 Words   |  4 Pagessociety there was always one constant in their life—nature. Nature was a creative force that contained the ability to either kill them or keep them alive with no preference for the human’s opinion. As humankind formed society and began to exert their own force against nature, and nature became â€Å"a social creation as much as it is the physical universe† (TB 107) as this balance of power shifted unknowingly into the hands of humans. With this ability nature began to become a haven that people could escapeRead MoreThe Four Paradigms Of The Four Major Paradigms Of Psychology968 Words   |  4 Pagestheories will be discussed thoroughly and efficiently. Each of the theories was placed on a spectrum that measured whether they were more influenced by heredity or environment. Some, as many can see, can fit into both sides of the spectrum. There are many factors that are invo lved in the process, and each are important variables in personality and the evolution of humanity. Four Paradigms of Psychology NATURE-Psycho-analytic/dynamic-Social-Cognitive-Behavioral-Humanism-NURTURE Psycho-analytic/dynamicRead MoreThe Theory Of Light And Its Effects On The Human Eyes963 Words   |  4 PagesLight, a concept that has been worked with for many years dating back to 500 B.C. Pythagoras hypothesized that humans perceive light due to the human eyes ability to emit rays upon the environment and the emittance gives a human his or her sight (Sekuler). Afterward, human intellectuals started making it more concise to present day knowledge of light. This development of light came from two intellectuals named Christian Huygens and Isaac Newton. Newton exclaimed during the 1700s that light was aRead MoreThe And Divine Nature Of The Bible1393 Words   |  6 Pagesdesired to communicate to us.† (Created for Community, 1998, p 166) This paper will examine the orthodox view on the human and divine nature of the Bible, the Holy Spirit’s role in the inspiration and illumination, and the ultimate goal of the Bible. This paper will also discuss the two arguments known as the inerrantist and infallibilist views. â€Å"Some in the movement saw the Bible as a human book that was to be studied using methods common to the study of any other literature, while others continued toRead MoreHow A 2d Framework Of Mind Perception899 Words   |  4 Pagesfeelings), with three subclinical syndromes: autism-spectrum disorder, schizotypy, and psychopathy. By reviewing current literatures, a distinct profile of under- and overperception of agency and/or experience was speculated for each syndrome. Specifically, Gray et al. hypothesized that people high in autism spectrum would be characterized by underperception of agency in adult human, people high in schizotypy would overperceive mind in non-human targets, and people with psychopathic tendencies wouldRead MoreHumans Nature - Good or Bad? Essay1132 Words   |  5 PagesHuman Nature Good or Bad? Whether human beings are instinctually good or evil in an elementary natural state is a question that has been boggling the minds of even the greatest philosophers. There is a spectrum of theories that support both good and evil within the human race, each with valid points that explains the range of our interests, being either for ourselves or for others. However, my personal stance is the sensible theory of Altruism. Past experiences and observations allow me toRead MoreLife And Nature Are Very Similar. Both Are Complex, Yet1124 Words   |  5 PagesLife and nature are very similar. Both are complex, yet simple, both are beautiful, and both are all around, yet cannot be created artificially. The constitution of both is often explored in different forms of art, such as poetry. In her poem, â€Å"Nature† Is What We See, Emily Dickinson uses personification, imagery, contrast, and an extensive use of dashes to convey the theme of nature’s dangerous beauty and incredibl e simplicity, as well as its extreme complexity and the completeness of its unattainabilityRead MoreVoltaire s Candide : A Satirical Work Wrought With Black Humor And Caricature Like Characters Essay1727 Words   |  7 Pagesphilosophies which each in their own way attempt to confront and remedy this existential conflict. He frames these characters’ worldviews in such a way as to create a philosophical spectrum with optimism and pessimism being at opposite extremes amongst other worldviews, such as meliorism and quietism, within the spectrum. The brand of philosophical optimism depicted and mocked in Candide was popularized by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, a German mathematician and philosopher(CITE). Leibniz s versionRead MoreThe Sublime Is Defined By Edmund Burke, Arthur Schopenhauer, And Immanuel Kant973 Words   |  4 Pagesobject in accordance with reason’s demand for â€Å"absolute totality.† Instances of the mathematically sublime include towering skyscrapers, expansive mountain ranges, and the vastness of the ocean. The dynamically sublime appears when we experience nature as fearful, even though we might be in a position of safety and therefore have no reason to be afraid. The realization of nature’s power makes us, â€Å"as natural beings, recognize our physical powerless.† Instances of the dynamically sublime include

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Western Ideology of Orientalism in John Luther Long’s play...

Outline I. Introduction Topic sentence: II. Madame Butterfly The Western ideology of the Eastern exoticism and docility originates from the long historical context of imperialism and political tensions between the West and the East. Domestic struggles caused by political strife and war in the East, such as the Philippines during the American-Spanish War and China during the Opium Wars, created an opportunity for the West to infiltrate the destabilized Eastern countries. This access allowed the West to exercise a form of supremacy over Asia, as the East was seen as powerless and incapable of self-governance. Thus, considering themselves as racially and politically superior, the West adopted a â€Å"White Man’s Burden† mentality; it is the duty of the Western men to dominate the East and civilize the â€Å"uneducated† and â€Å"old-fashioned† Orientals. This historical framework would eventually construct the Oriental stereotype of the â€Å"Lotus Blossom† and the Oriental â€Å"Butterflyà ¢â‚¬ . As portrayed by the delicate and docile character, Hana-Ogi, in the film Sayonara (1957), the â€Å"Lotus Blossom† depicts an Oriental woman who is quiet, modest, and always submissive to her man. Writer Sui Seen further emphasizes this stereotypical figure in her description of Chinese merchant wives: â€Å"She has a true affection for her husband [†¦] She loves him because she has been given to him to be his wife. No question of â€Å"woman’s rights’ perplexes her. She takes no responsibility upon herself and wishesShow MoreRelatedThe Oriental And Gender Stereotype1230 Words   |  5 Pagesindy Coronado March 2, 15 HILD 7B A10923676 TA: Josh Newton 1:00-1:50 The Oriental and Gender Stereotype M.Butterfly, an opera by David Huang, is recognized as a reexamination of John Luther Long’s Madame Butterfly. During the beginning of the 20th century, Asian and Asian Americans were often perceived to a collective stereotype. Well-defined differences between the American Westerner and the Oriental are undermined in both of these readings as â€Å"the west† is seen as the more masculine region and